Freelance work permit NOT self-employed word permit
Posted: 14 March 2013 04:30 AM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2012-11-18

Hello everyone,

I have been searching and searching for definitive information with regards to obtaining a FREELANCE WORK PERMIT and not self employed to start my own company by depositing 150,000 euros! I am NOT a journalist either. I am a certified English Instructor and have been teaching for nearly 15 years. First in the late 90’s in Spain. I had a bank account, rental lease and actually worked in a school. They made promises and I gave up and returned to the states. If I would have stayed, I would have fallen under the grandfather clause and would have been able to stay…..legally.

Non-eu and from the States, I speak sufficient Spanish and Italian and do all the trinity and Cambridge exams, as well as TOEFL. Business English to even young learners and no lawyers here have a clue of how to apply. I know how to apply and have my back ground check with the hague apostille and medical certificate. I teach online and have a contract with a company here in the states for teaching their expats, as well as my own private students, online. What is it going to take to get this permit and someone that can help me get it? I am so frustrated! I want to do it legally and I want to contribute to the economy in Spain, etc. Yes, that means moving back to Europe, I lived in Italy for 6 years and wish I would have stayed! Any advise would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

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Posted: 14 March 2013 11:23 PM  
Administrator
Total Posts:  1692
Joined  2005-12-05

There’s no way to do it legally unless you start a company (the 150k option you mentioned) or find a company to sponsor you, which is possible but highly improbable in the current economic climate.

Other ways that may exist to be partially (but not entirely) legal:
• Arrive on a non-lucrative visa and work anyway
• Get sent to Spain by a media publication and get a journalist visa but work in teaching anyway
• Arrive on a tourist visa, set up a small autonomo business so you can pay taxes and get healthcare, then overstay your time and take freelance work without a work permit anyway
• Find an EU spouse

Clearly none of the above options are ideal nor entirely legal, but they’re probably the only ones left to you.

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Posted: 20 March 2013 03:59 AM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2012-11-18

Thank you very much for the reply. I greatly appreciate it. I have read on other sites some of the options, but I wanted to do it legally. I would not want to be questioned coming or going and then be banned. I worked in spain for almost 2 years in the late 90’s, thinking the school would have kept their promise to sponsor me, but no being older and wiser, I know better.

What about highly skilled? I’d hate to pay a lawyer to file all my forms for me, pay those fees and then be denied.
What about coming as a student (late 40’s) and being able to work 20 hours a week, but I think it states I have to be full time as a student. How difficult would it be to change, renew permits and visa (work and residence)? I was thinking about coming and renting a room for at least 6 months, so I have an address in spain to put on the application form.

If I am not mistaken, it is quite easy to obtain an NIE, even on a tourist visa, 3 months-6 months, perhaps they don’t ask questions, because they get the $ for the amount of “people” in the certain districts, right?

A company out of Marbella said they would get me a NIE, for around $264 euro, but I had to deposit lots of money into a bank, they would apply for me via POA, stating I wanted to open a bank account.

Other ways that may exist to be partially (but not entirely) legal:
With this option, you still need to show a hefty amount in your account, I have a contract with a company that I bill in increments• Arrive on a non-lucrative visa and work anyway

Thanks for the advice, but in my opinion, I’m a teacher and I don’t actually see this as an option• Get sent to Spain by a media publication and get a journalist visa but work in teaching anyway
This I intend to do, paying taxes, pay into social security and get healthcare-small is right, just me, but I would also hire an accountant, ok, overstay and then what if I am asked for an NIE or passport or ???• Arrive on a tourist visa, set up a small autonomo business so you can pay taxes and get healthcare, then overstay your time and take freelance work without a work permit anyway
Ahhh….right! • Find an EU spouse

Clearly none of the above options are ideal nor entirely legal, but they’re probably the only ones left to you. (I understand this, I just find it hard to understand that one would like to contribute to the economy, is not taking a job from anyone in the EU, works online, but pays for rent, an accountant, healthcare/social security and is willing and able to pay taxes. I just can not understand why my visa would not be granted? Hence, writing this prior to paying an attorney to help. (here in the states). Would appreciate your comments.

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Posted: 20 March 2013 04:12 AM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2012-11-18

Plus, I would like to ship my household goods at some point and I do not think one would be able to do that, without proper documentation. Lived in another (near) country for 6 years, and did it, never had any problems coming or going, nor with shipping my things there and back. I think the customs are different for Spain. Any thoughts?

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Posted: 21 March 2013 01:25 AM  
Expatriator
Total Posts:  101
Joined  2007-02-02

I just find it hard to understand that one would like to contribute to the economy, is not taking a job from anyone in the EU, works online, but pays for rent, an accountant, healthcare/social security and is willing and able to pay taxes. I just can not understand why my visa would not be granted?

As far as I know, you could actually say the same about most countries. Unfortunately, immigration policies just aren’t advanced enough yet to allow for freelancers who work online. Sorry!

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Posted: 22 March 2013 02:23 AM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2012-11-18
The Expatriator - 14 March 2013 11:23 PM

There’s no way to do it legally unless you start a company (the 150k option you mentioned) or find a company to sponsor you, which is possible but highly improbable in the current economic climate.

Other ways that may exist to be partially (but not entirely) legal:
• Arrive on a non-lucrative visa and work anyway
• Get sent to Spain by a media publication and get a journalist visa but work in teaching anyway
• Arrive on a tourist visa, set up a small autonomo business so you can pay taxes and get healthcare, then overstay your time and take freelance work without a work permit anyway
• Find an EU spouse

Clearly none of the above options are ideal nor entirely legal, but they’re probably the only ones left to you.

Thanks again-I found the following and I am wondering if IT is truly correct-

The general procedure for immigration to Spain is this: •You deliver your visa application in person at the Spanish Embassy in your country of residence.
•The Embassy forwards the application to the authorities in Spain.
•If your application is approved, the Embassy will call you to pick up your visa. You have 30 days to pick up your visa.
•With the visa, you travel to Spain. Your visa is valid for 90 days: you must enter Spain during that time.
•Within 30 days of your arrival in Spain, you must apply for your residence permit (with NIE number).
•You must renew your permit periodically. Your initial residence permit allows you to stay in Spain for one year. As long as the conditions for your residence permit are maintained, residency in Spain may be renewed indefinitely.

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Posted: 01 January 2014 07:10 PM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  9
Joined  2012-11-18

UPDATE 01/01/2014

There is a way to do it, without starting a business! I started this process in February of 2013, yes, it takes time. I am an English Teacher-Business, etc. The lawyer I worked with from Malaga, suggested I register with the CIAE, which I did. I DID need to put together a business plan and a projection for 3 years. Gathering all my invoices from the past year, paypal accounts, etc, the project was 126 pages. The CIAE approved my project in September of 2013. Still, I am not a business, an autonomous worker, no need to deposit loads of money. I did it backwards. I came in April, got an apartment, filed for a pardon, NIE, which, was approved, and I had to come back and pay the fee, in May because of Feria. I got my NIE months prior to filing for my visa. After the CIAE approved my project, I made my visa appt with the Consulate in my country of the U.S. This was October 2nd, 2013. My documentation was sent to Spain, on Thanksgiving Day, of all days, just a month or so, the Ministry of Spain, granted my work and residence for cuenta propria.

It was the hardest thing I have ever had to do, without a business degree, putting together this plan, but I did it. If I can do it many others can too. I picked up my visa on the 20th of December, 2013. I am now back in Spain and heading to get my residence card tomorrow. Note, that with this visa, I have to pay social security myself, however, the CIAE has changed the law with regards to new autonomous workers, where the past amount was about 250 euros a month, down to around 50 euros for the first 6 months or so, to be able to get going as a freelance worker. Pretty nice. I have also contacted a lawyer whom will do my taxes, etc on a quarterly basis for around 60 euro a month, some state 50, but, I would prefer to have this Gestor in my area, versus online. An initial fee of 110 to evaluate my status and get things in order for me. I have been teaching since 1997, submitted loads of paperwork, kept all my recommendations throughout the years and added those to my project.

Therefore, those of you that might think you would like to do what I have done, it is a hard process, but I saved thousands, doing it myself. The first lawyer I contacted, hadn’t a clue and was giving me the wrong information. Wanted a payment upfront, but when I confronted this person with regards to what I had done regarding my NIE, I decided to do it myself, with the help of this other lawyer in Malaga, whom was informed and the costs of translation of documents were very reasonable. PM, me, if I can be of any help and if you would like this lawyer’s contact info.

It can be done! Happy New Year all! I did it!!!

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Posted: 03 January 2014 07:54 AM  
Expatriator
Total Posts:  101
Joined  2007-02-02

Congratulations! I’m glad to hear it worked out for you!

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