Poll
Is the EU Blue Card system going to be a net positive policy or a net negative policy for Spain in the long run?
It will be a net positive policy for Spain’s economy, culture and society. 3
It will be a net negative policy for Spain’s economy, culture and society. 1
I’m not sure yet, more information needed. 1
Total Votes: 5
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EU Blue Card in Spain
Posted: 20 June 2009 09:26 PM  
Administrator
Total Posts:  1692
Joined  2005-12-05

I’m going to start a post to track information on the EU Blue Card right here. If and when people find new information on the Blue Card or, particularly, its implementation for Spain, please post it here. Try to keep questions as relevant as possible. Off topic or negative comments will be deleted (no offense, just trying to keep the information here succinct.

From EU Blue Card, here are the main features of the European Blue Card system:

  * The Blue Card will offer candidates speedier work permits and make it easier for migrants’ families to join them, find public housing and acquire long-term resident status.

  * After 18 months of working with a Blue Card in one EU state, an immigrant may move with his/her family to work in another EU state, but must apply for a new Blue Card there within a month of arrival.

  * To be eligible for a Blue Card, migrants must be offered a job with a gross annual salary of at least 1.5 times the average wage in the EU state concerned — falling to 1.2 times average earnings in areas with strong labour gaps.

  * Migrants must have the equivalent of a bachelor’s degree, or at least five years of professional experience of a comparable level, to apply for a Blue Card.

  * Governments may refuse to issue the Blue Card citing labour market problems or if national quotas are exceeded.

  * Each EU state will decide how long a Blue Card will be valid, with a maximum of four years. It remains valid for at least three months if the migrant loses his or her job.

  * High-skilled foreign workers make up 1.7 percent of migrant workers in the EU, compared with a share of 9.9 percent in Australia, 7.3 percent in Canada and 3.2 percent in the United States, EU data show.

  * The scheme enters into force 30 months after EU governments endorse it in the coming weeks, an EU official said.

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Posted: 23 June 2009 07:56 PM  
Expatriator
Total Posts:  95
Joined  2009-05-27

I just read the third bullet point…. so… how is this much different than the current policy in Spain? You can already get an employer to sponsor you for a work permit. What’s the difference between the Blue Card and the existing Spanish temporary work permit?

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Posted: 24 June 2009 08:27 AM  
Administrator
Total Posts:  1692
Joined  2005-12-05

As I read it, it means that they don’t have to ensure an EU citizen can fill the role, meaning no 6 month search. I’m wondering if it means not returning home to pick up your passport and visa (blue card) too! That’d be nice.

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“Vocation is where your greatest passion and the world’s greatest need overlap.”

Now follow SpainExpat.com on Twitter for updates, advice, news, and forum highlights.

Recommended reading: working visa (non EU), other visas, jobs in Spain, teaching English (non EU), finding apartments, holidays, mobile/cell phones, NIE cards, gestors.

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Posted: 25 February 2010 01:31 PM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2008-01-29

Hi folks.  I’ve been living in Spain (Barcelona) since late 2008 on a standard Spanish residence + work permit, and working for much of that time, on regular indefinite work contracts.

Has anyone got any information about whether the time spent here on my present Spanish-only work visa status may be ‘grandfathered in’ to a Blue Card (a new Blue Card, should I first apply for one now, as I’ve not done so before)?  My idea is to have that grandfathered time count towards the 18 months requirement after which the card may (more easily) be transferred to another member state.

Don’t get me wrong - I love living here and want to stay, but the nature (pay) of my work declined quite a bit, and higher paying opportunities are much more likely to be found in other member states ... but elsewhere there seems to be great hesitation (understandably in the current economy) on the part of companies to try to apply for new work permits for third country nationals such as myself (I’m a US citizen).

Thanks,
Jay
Barcelona

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Posted: 27 December 2017 03:57 PM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2017-12-27

Hello guys! I’m student from Lithuania and i want to move out to Spain, because it is my dream country. As i see this chat is old, but maybe someone will answer me. Maybe you can tell me where i can get more information about Blue Card? I found one page where a lot of information: https://www.bizbon.com/services-in-spain/spanish-eu-blue-card/ but i don’t think so that are enough. Am i wrong? Thanks for all answers!

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