3 of 4
3
Spanish citizenship by descent (process)
Posted: 02 March 2012 12:42 AM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2012-03-01

I want to add my question to this topic because it’s similar.

I am interested in if I can get Spanish Citizenship.

I am a native-born US citizen.

My mother was born in Spain, but moved to the US when she was very young and is a naturalized US citizen.  She doesn’t have active Spanish citizenship and didn’t when I was born. I am not sure if her father ever had Spanish citizenship (she never asked) but her mother had citizenship by birth.

From what I can gather she can claim her citizenship anytime she wants to. But can I claim citizenship through her?

I know that I can through my grandparents but from what I read that requires a year of residence and lots more paperwork.
(Is that right? And if not what does it require?)

I am also under 20. So can I claim Citizenship by option?

I have lots of family that still lives in Spain if that makes any difference. (Vouch for me or the like.)

Thanks for any help in advance!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 March 2012 10:03 AM  
Expatriator
Total Posts:  453
Joined  2008-12-30

My mother was born in Spain, but moved to the US when she was very young and is a naturalized US citizen.  She doesn’t have active Spanish citizenship and didn’t when I was born. I am not sure if her father ever had Spanish citizenship (she never asked) but her mother had citizenship by birth.

try to get her spanish birth certificate and go to the spanish consulate in your area and verify if she ever renounced her citizenship

From what I can gather she can claim her citizenship anytime she wants to. But can I claim citizenship through her?

if she is still a spanish citizen, her being a native born spaniard makes her ctizenship “de origen” which means she can pass on her citizenship to you automatically. you will be just be registered with a new spanish birth certificate. once done you can get your dni and passport and ss, etc.
consult consulate and get ready and used to unamerican bureaucracy.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 18 March 2012 02:38 PM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2012-03-01

Sorry, but I just wanted to clarity your response to me. Thank you for responding.


My mother, as an adult, never formally renounced her citizenship in Spain. When she was 1 1/2 her father moved to the US (her mother died a Spanish citizen) and she was naturalized at age 4.

I wasn’t sure if it was taken from her by, say age 20, since she never moved back to Spain. Wouldn’t simply living in the US be reason to lose active citizenship?
I think I see what you are saying. I know she can’t lose her Right to Spanish Citizenship as long as she lives, but because she never renounced it, has she retained citizenship all that time?

All I can say is that I know for certain that she doesn’t think she ever formally renounced it at a Spanish Consulate or anything like that, and maybe then she still does have it.
I thought at least it might be dormant, or something.


She still has her birth certificate, (it isn’t very useful over here, since no one can read it), but she has the original.

So, I know I can get citizenship by option (I’m not 20 yet), but could I (or my siblings) get de origen?

Thank you so much!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 March 2012 07:21 PM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2012-03-27

I have a related question:

My father (now deceased) was born in Madrid in 1940 to spanish parents. He immigrated to the U.S. at age 12 and became a naturalized U.S. citizen as a teenager. I have his spanish birth certificate, along with my grandmothers. I may have my grandfathers as well.

I am 50 years old and am interested in gaining spanish citizenship I have been there dozens of times and would like to preserve my spanish heritage and possibly retire there.

Is there any possibility at this stage?

Thanks,

Profile
 
 
Posted: 19 April 2012 03:19 PM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2012-04-19

I’m new to this site, so if I bungle the protocols please forgive me.  My husband and I are considering moving to Spain from northern Europe.  I’m American, he’s Dutch.  My last name is Spanish.  I understand that the Law of Historical Memory just expired, but I’m wondering if it would help at all (to get Spanish citizenship) if I can show that I am descended from a Spanish great grandfather who was a Spanish military officer in the Pacific before and during the Spanish American War.  This has to do with “historical memory” that goes back to the 19th century, when my great grandfather and grandfather were both born in the Pacific, in Manila and Guam, respectively - at the end of the Spanish Empire and the beginning of the American Empire. I doubt that I can obtain any official, apostilled documents from that time of war and turmoil (more on that in a minute).  So I wonder if this is too far a stretch for me to claim Spanish citizenship, even though my great grandfather was the military secretary to the Spanish governor of the Mariana Islands, and was the first Spanish officer to be captured as a prisoner of war in the Spanish American War.  My great grandfather’s name is all over civil documents in Guam preceding the American invasion of Guam.  He was even the postmaster in Guam after the Americans took over, as well as an unofficial advisor to the American governor.  There are records of that. 

However, establishing the connection between me and my great grandfather through my grandfather is the problem.  I just learned this week that getting a birth certificate for my grandfather, who was born in Guam in 1890±, is impossible.  In 1944 (the year of my birth), the Americans bombed Guam so thoroughly to get the Japanese to leave that all church records were destroyed, and it was the churches that kept birth and death records.  All my great grandfather’s many children and grandchildren apparently left Guam, probably long before I was born.  My grandfather emigrated to California, where my father was born in 1918.  But I have no official documents related to my grandfather’s existence, and I don’t know where in Southern California he lived or when and where he died.  I only met him when I was a child, and my father is now deceased.

It’s a strange story with a twist at the end: in the 15th and 16th centuries Spain becomes an empire, discovering and settling the Americas, as well as some of the Pacific islands.  Several centuries later, Spain is challenged and defeated by “America” (the United States), and a Spanish family that was sent from Spain to the Pacific ends up in California.  One of the daughters of that family, who grew up in California, recognizes late in life that the American empire is coming to an end, and wants to end her time on Earth in the country of her paternal lineage.  She wants to connect with her Spanish genes after having been dominated by her anglo-saxon lineage most of her life.  She wants to live in Andalusia, where her father’s lineage comes from.  But she can’t prove her connection with her grandfather and father lineage because the country where she was born destroyed the records. 

Does anybody have any ideas about how to bring a happy ending to this story?  I’d be very grateful.  Thank you for listening to this tale.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 May 2012 04:08 PM  
Expatriator
Total Posts:  453
Joined  2008-12-30
Mitch Nieto - 27 March 2012 07:21 PM

I have a related question:

My father (now deceased) was born in Madrid in 1940 to spanish parents. He immigrated to the U.S. at age 12 and became a naturalized U.S. citizen as a teenager. I have his spanish birth certificate, along with my grandmothers. I may have my grandfathers as well.

I am 50 years old and am interested in gaining spanish citizenship I have been there dozens of times and would like to preserve my spanish heritage and possibly retire there.

Is there any possibility at this stage?

Thanks,

children of spain-born spanish citizens may get spanish citizenship automatically. consult the spanish consulate in your area. i know one case first hand.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 27 May 2012 04:17 PM  
Expatriator
Total Posts:  453
Joined  2008-12-30

I understand that the Law of Historical Memory just expired, but I’m wondering if it would help at all (to get Spanish citizenship) if I can show that I am descended from a Spanish great grandfather who was a Spanish military officer in the Pacific before and during the Spanish American War.

it is not contemplated in the current citizenship acquisition laws of spain. right now you are a usa citizen. you will have to reside for 10 continuous years in spain to get citizenship. you will not have problems getting residency as your spouse is a dutch citizen.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 July 2012 05:15 AM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2012-07-12

Another citizenship by descent question from a US citizen looking to obtain Spainish citizenship.

My grandmother was born in Spain and left just after birth in 1911.  We have the original birth certificate from Spain.  I was told there was a way to apply for citizenship via “La Ley de Memoria Historica” being that her family left in distress.  The dates listed for this do not line up with the 1911 time frame and I have not been able to find much, if any, info in english about this.

Wondering if anyone has any info on the “La Ley de Memoria Historica” and if this might work for me?  If not, is there any hope of a different path for me to get citizenship?

Thank you for the help.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 July 2012 09:25 PM  
Expatriator
Total Posts:  453
Joined  2008-12-30
2amigos - 12 July 2012 05:15 AM

My grandmother was born in Spain and left just after birth in 1911.  We have the original birth certificate from Spain.  I was told there was a way to apply for citizenship via “La Ley de Memoria Historica” being that her family left in distress.  The dates listed for this do not line up with the 1911 time frame and I have not been able to find much, if any, info in english about this.

Wondering if anyone has any info on the “La Ley de Memoria Historica” and if this might work for me? 
Thank you for the help.

the ley de memoria histórica is no longer in force. it had a deadline. it would not have work for you because it only covered, descendants of spaniards who left spain at the start of the civil war up to the 1950’s.

If not, is there any hope of a different path for me to get citizenship?

your only way is to get legal residency and as a grandchild of a spanish born citizen, you can start applying for citizenship at the beginning of your second year as legal resident. processing takes about a year and a half. you will have to renounce your present citizenship (except citizenshif of former spanish colonies) before a spanish judge. this may be held valid or not by the laws of your country.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 July 2012 10:24 PM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2012-07-12

Thanks aritz,

Thought there may be something easier for me.  Thanks again.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 13 July 2012 05:36 PM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2012-04-19

Yes, I would like to thank Aritz also for responding clearly to my query.  Thank you.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 January 2013 10:34 PM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2013-01-29

Hi I’m new to this forum, but noticed that the information in this thread seems very precise and was wondering if someone could help with a question i have regarding applying for spanish citizenship.
My father just recently gained Spanish Citizenship through his grandfather.  My father and I were born in Argentina, and I currently have dual citizenship (Argentina/United States).  I’m considering grad school in Spain at the moment, and was wondering what if anything I can do to get Spanish citizenship?  Do I have to reside one, two, 10 years, no time at all, etc or is it not possible ? 
Thank you for the help.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 04 February 2013 06:14 PM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2013-02-04

Hi everyone.
I am new member and have a question.
I am 62. and born in the US. My mother was born in the US, father was born in West Virginia in the early 1920’s. His father and mother were Spanish citizens and came to the US in 1920.
I just found out about my grandparents. I had no contact with them. I believe they became US citizens in the 1970’s or 1980’s.
Is it possible once I have the documentation, birth certificates, etc. to become a Spanish citizen through ancestry?
I am not sure how to get my grandparents birth certificates.
My father, mother and grandparents are deceased.
Thank you for any information.
Rosabella

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 June 2013 01:43 AM  
Tourist
Total Posts:  1
Joined  2013-06-21

New to the forum and I hope someone can help me.

My grandmother was born in Morocco, she held spanish passport but lived in Italy and then moved to Canada where she currently lives. My mother was born Italy and has Italian and Spanish passports, both I think by now are expired as she has lived in the for 30+ years. Would I be eligible to get citizenship based on the fact that they held passports even though neither one was actually born in Spain?

My wife on the other hand was born in Madrid but her parents weren’t citizens yet and only had resident visa’s. We are both US citizens and plan to move to Spain soon.

TIA for your help.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 22 June 2013 10:56 PM  
Expatriator
Total Posts:  453
Joined  2008-12-30
Medic97 - 21 June 2013 01:43 AM

New to the forum and I hope someone can help me.

My grandmother was born in Morocco, she held spanish passport but lived in Italy and then moved to Canada where she currently lives. My mother was born Italy and has Italian and Spanish passports, both I think by now are expired as she has lived in the for 30+ years. Would I be eligible to get citizenship based on the fact that they held passports even though neither one was actually born in Spain?

My wife on the other hand was born in Madrid but her parents weren’t citizens yet and only had resident visa’s. We are both US citizens and plan to move to Spain soon.

TIA for your help.

first, check if your grandmother and mother are still spanish citizens. get copies of their spanish birth certificates. if they are españoles de origen then they can automatically pass on their citizenship to you. then go to the spanish consulate nearest your residence to get the requirements and information on this matter
second, get a copy of your wife’s birth certificate in madrid to see exactly if she got dual citizenship after birth.

Profile
 
 
   
3 of 4
3